How to avoid burnout, beat stress, and find calm amidst the storm (a guide for when life gets crazy)

“Every search begins with beginner’s luck. And every search ends with the victors being severely tested.” – Paulo Coelho in the Alchemist

Jan 29th, 2018: Finally, the professional speaker’s training that I’ve worked on for years is live and ready for students. Unfortunately, the rollout has been more turbulent than I could have imagined.

Over the past two weeks:

  • A partner quit the project because he’s starting a business that will compete directly with mine.
  • The designer I hired left the project because her husband is suffering from serious health issues.
  • Sales are way below where I want them to be.
  • I’ve been hit with a cease and desist because the title of the training uses language owned by a competitor. Meeting the demands of the cease and desist (which my lawyer tells me I need to do quickly) will require reworking the marketing and technology behind the training.
  • And the cherry on top? Things in my personal life that I have no control over (like the health of loved ones) are going haywire too.  

I should be completely broken, but I’m not. I’m driving to a friend’s house to grab dinner and chill for a bit. I feel playful and happy. Stressed too, of course, but not nearly as much as anyone – myself included – would expect.

***

I’m tempted to tell you that I was able to remain calm during the darkest hours of the storm, because I’m the modern day Fonzie, but obviously, I’m not. I knew that the beginning of 2018 was going to be extremely stressful and demanding, so I decided to try a lot of new stress management techniques. My goal was not merely to keep my head above water, but to enjoy the process. To my delight (and surprise), I succeeded.

There were eight strategies that worked remarkably well.

1) Set reasonable expectations for everyone – yourself included. In the past, when life got chaotic, I responded by increasing my workload while maintaining all of my other commitments.

This, though common, is a near perfect formula for burnout.

With this most recent whirlwind, I did something different. I told everyone in my life that I’m going to be temporarily less available than normal as I deal with an increased workload. (This is one of the reasons I didn’t publish a single article in January.)

Of the dozens of people I spoke to, only one struggled with this decision. Me.

I still wanted to hold on to the idea that I can maintain my normal life regardless of the increased demands on my attention. Unfortunately, I have a long history of burning myself out, so I knew that unless I changed my behavior and attitude, I would burn out again.

By adjusting people’s expectations of my availability, I was able to avoid the burnout that typically plagues me. Now that my life has settled down again, I’ve spent the past week reconnecting with friends and clients and all of them understood – and supported – my decision.

2) Fortify the foundations. Usually when life gets chaotic, the first behaviors to change are the very ones that keep us sane. We tell ourselves that it’s ok to skip the gym if we need to squeeze in a few more hours of work, or that if we’re too tired to cook, we can grab takeout on the way home.

I get it. I’ve done that a million times. The problem is that sacrificing self-care only exacerbates stress.

This time, I went in the exact opposite direction. Since I knew the demands on my time and attention were going to spike, I scheduled time for meditation, exercise, sleep, and social events into my calendar. This forced me to schedule work around the stuff that keeps me happy and grounded, not vice versa.

To further fortify the foundations, I temporarily quit caffeine (it makes me anxious) and stocked up on healthy food.

3) Stop pushing through walls and learn to respect your limits. For most of my life, I kept working until I was exhausted. I learned to push through walls, a skill prized by many self-described “top performers” and “Type A’s.” The problem with pushing through walls is that it’s almost never worth it. Even if you accomplish a bit more than you would have, your future productivity will suffer. More importantly, your present and future happiness, stability, and vitality will suffer too.

Choosing to push beyond your limits is a form of neglect. Learning to rest before you’re tired is a form of self-respect.

Now, when I feel myself starting to approach the wall, I rest. Instead of opening my email, I catch up on Game of Thrones. Instead of working for one more sale, I go for a walk without my phone. Instead of taking a meeting that’s unlikely to produce anything of value, I call a friend.

At first, respecting my limits felt wrong. It made me feel guilty and like I was a slacker. Today, resting before I’m tired is one of my most cherished habits. It’s left me with a steady reserve of energy, calm, happiness, and focus. It’s also armed with me a far greater work capacity, though that’s not really the point.

4) Transition before resting. This is a trick that I learned from a CrossFit coach. She emphasized transitioning between movements before resting. In other words if you have to do several rounds of pull-ups and squats she suggests finishing the pull-ups and immediately switching to squats – even just one – before taking a break. This works, because, while the upper body is exhausted from the pull-ups, the lower body can still get a few squats in before coming anywhere near needing to stop.

Not only is this a brilliant move in CrossFit, it also works well outside the gym.

Today, before I take a break, I try to create a little bit of inertia on whatever I’ll be focusing on when I return. This way I’m both refreshed and focused when I get back, making work less stressful.

5) Lean on your people like your life depends on it. The most chaotic moment in the last two weeks came shortly after receiving a cease and desist about a trademark violation. Sales were already below where I wanted them to be, and fixing the violation was complicated.

It’s easy in moments like this to collapse under the pressure of it all, but in retrospect, it was one of the best parts of the entire process. It led to my feeling extremely loved and cared for by my friends.

Over the past year, I’ve gotten in the habit of reaching out to loved ones when I need help or comfort from other people.1 Before that, I used to hide away from the world until I felt better, not allowing anyone to see me when I was feeling distressed. I feared that asking for help was both needy and a sign of inadequacy.

So, when the shit hit the fan, I called, texted, and emailed my friends. I told them what was happening and that I could really use their support. Wow, did they come through.

One loaned me his car. Another offered to fix the technology so it was in compliance; someone else connected me with a specialized lawyer who could help navigate the situation. Yet another brought me dinner, and a bunch of friends checked in to see how I was doing.

The end result? During the most demanding moment of the whirlwind, I felt light, playful, safe, and capable. More than that, everything ended up being fine. I fixed the copyright violation and sales ended up exceeding industry averages. But here’s the important part: the success was only possible because of the people supporting me. Without them, I would have collapsed.

6) When possible, just bypass the stress. Stress is amplified by anticipation and overanalysis. There are two tricks to avoiding these tendencies which will allow you to bypass huge amounts of stress.

First, figure out what issue is causing the most stress. Once that’s clear, start working on that problem now. If you continuously put it off (which most of us do), you’re  forcing yourself to live with much more stress than necessary.

Ignoring problems tends to make them worse. They command mental and emotional resources and will continue to plague you until you address them. By acting on the stressors in real time, you eliminate their ability to linger and fester.

Second, only spend time analyzing the stuff that needs it (and most things don’t). In many cases, analysis is just a hidden form of procrastination. All you need to do is ask yourself, “If I make the wrong decision here, will it be hard to undo it?” and “Will there be serious repercussions if I get this decision wrong?” If the answer to these questions is no, then there’s no need to spend much time contemplating. Just take action.

7) Indulge in Do Nothing Days. This is a tip that two of my friends have advocated for years. A Do Nothing Day is exactly what you think it is. You spend the entire day lounging around and intentionally avoiding stress. You binge watch Netflix, order delivery, read magazines, play video games, and take naps. If something has the potential to spike your stress levels, avoid it.

Waking up the next morning after a Do Nothing Day feels like getting back from a beach vacation. It’s revitalizing.

Knowing that I was going to be under more pressure than normal, I scheduled several Do Nothing Days. They were bright lights at the end of the tunnel and ensured that I rested before burning out.

8) Ask, “What is the kindest decision I make for myself right now?” I learned this from a meditation teacher. It’s simple. When you find yourself facing a difficult decision, ask, “What is the kindest decision that I can make for myself right now?”

Keep in mind that the kindest thing is not always the easiest and is often a moving target. Sometimes it’s getting up early to get work done before your first meeting. Other times it’s cancelling the meeting, telling your boss your work will be late, and sleeping in.

By asking, “What’s the kindest thing I can do for me?” you’ll start to make decisions that gracefully walk the line of being efficient and compassionate.

Why I turned comments off

As the blog grows, managing comments has become more difficult than it’s worth, so I’ve decided to turn the comments section off. It’s not that there are so many comments that I can’t keep up, it’s that they take up time, focus, and energy that would be better dedicated to other projects (like working on new articles).

While keeping comments open may be good for SEO and social proof, it’s not good for my sanity. So, as an act of self-care, I’ve decided to turn them off.

Does this mean I no longer want to hear from you and other readers? Absolutely not.

Connecting with readers as well as trading stories and ideas is one of the most meaningful parts of this blog. I want you to reach out and let me know how I’m doing. The best way to do this is by subscribing to the blog here. You can also reach me through the contact form here.

2017 personal review: lessons, losses, and victories

I almost don’t know how to describe 2017. Over the course of the past year, I:

  • Was threatened with my first ever lawsuit (it scared the shit out of me when it happened, but now it feels strangely validating)
  • Closed my life coaching practice (I realized that virtually all of my clients would be better served by skilled therapists)
  • Changed the business model of my consulting practice to run by referral only
  • Built an amazing relationship with L*
  • Neglected, for the second year in a row, to hang anything in my apartment besides a giant whiteboard

But more than anything, 2017 was a year of personal growth. I learned more about life, relationships, and work than I expected. This article covers the most important lessons I learned this year. It also discusses the biggest mistakes and victories along the way. And if you’d like to compare this article to my 2016 recap, you can find it here.

The four most important lessons I learned this year

1) Rest before you’re tired. Like so many others, I thought that working to (or beyond) the point of exhaustion was no big deal. In fact, I thought that it was one of the best ways to get ahead. In reality, it’s neither. Exhaustion and burnout are glaring signs of personal neglect.

I’ve had a lifelong struggle with energy management, and it all came to a breaking point this summer. After eight weeks of being wildly overcommitted, I broke. For weeks after, I felt hollow, burnt out, and lifeless. Not only that, but it destroyed my ability to be present and caring with other people, jeopardizing my relationship with L*.

Though this wasn’t the first time I burnt myself out, it was the first time that I took the problem seriously and the time to find a solution. The fix? Learning to rest before you’re tired.

Unfortunately, resting before you’re tired goes against the grain for many people. We’re often encouraged to ignore our limits. For people like me, learning to rest before you’re tired can feel similar to giving up.

Preemptive rest is a daily practice of choosing not to push through the wall. It’s about learning to respect your limits (and yourself). This means strategically skipping events, occasionally cancelling plans, and pushing back deadlines as needed. It means choosing not to respond to unnecessary emails and invitations. It means doing less.

At first glance, it may seem like resting before you’re tired will make you less effective. For me, that hasn’t been the case, and I actually feel more productive. I’m also much happier and healthier.

2) There are skills that help romantic relationships flourish. I’m not sure how I came to this conclusion, but I used to think that healthy romantic relationships should require little to no effort. My logic was that if I didn’t effortlessly click with someone 98% of the time, then we are wrong for each other…

Holy shit was I being an idiot. I was neglecting a bunch of realities like:

  • Communication is an extremely imperfect and difficult art
  • Everyone has demons (both known and unknown) manipulating their behavior
  • Sometimes people just don’t quite link up for a bit

As it turns out though, being in a healthy romantic relationship – like almost everything worth pursuing – benefits from a bit of effort, thought, care, experimentation, and nurturing.

Earlier this year, L* and I kept getting into the same stupid fight over and over again (about what? I don’t think either of us could honestly tell you). Eventually, we figured out that if we wanted to improve our relationship, we needed to try new approaches to connecting.

We experimented with a bunch of ideas and skills to see if they moved the needle at all. There were two that stood out.

The first is scheduling time for our individual lives. This allows us to pursue friendships and activities in addition to the things we share within our relationship. It enables us to return to one another with new stories, ideas, and energy that wouldn’t have entered our lives otherwise. It also gives us a chance to miss one another.

The second is periodically “checking in” with each other. Check-ins are dedicated time for going over what’s happening in our lives as individuals and within the relationship. The goal of a check-in is to create space for thoughtful and loving openness, vulnerability, and collaboration. These are times dedicated to deepening our connection with curiosity and compassion instead of severing it with defensiveness or aggression.

During check-ins, one partner listens and asks questions while the other talks. After the first partner is done we switch rolls.

At the individual level we discuss work, stress, social lives, dreams, and anything else that’s affecting us. On the relationship level, we discuss what’s going well and what needs improvement. We also attempt to tackle any of the issues we may have been avoiding.

The results of the check-ins have been stunning. I’ve learned new things about L*, and we’ve been able to ward off tension before it became significant.

3) Want to improve pretty much every sphere of your life? Prioritize your mental health. My mental health was better in 2017 than ever before. I was happier, calmer, and more effective. I had more fun and dealt with less anxiety than ever before. Corny as it may sound, I often found myself thinking, “Holy shit life is good right now.”

I also got better at asking for comfort and dealing with difficult emotions. In the past, I used to ignore unpleasant feelings.  

I write about this all the time, so I’ll be brief: taking good care of your mental health is one of the most important – and bountiful – things you could ever do. The best recommendation I can make is to find a licensed mental health professional and work with her (more on how to do this, here).

4) Carry money for the homeless. Earlier this year my friend Z* mentioned that he always carries a few $1 bills to give to beggars. I started doing this too, and loved it.

It’s really simple. As needed, I get a bunch of $1 bills and give them to the people who ask for spare change. When I can, I pause and chat with the person I’m giving the money to. I keep the ones in a specific compartment of my wallet so that I don’t accidentally spend them.

If you can afford to do this, I urge you to do it. Not only does it help people in need, it’s also a constant reminder that you have more than enough.1017

Where I messed up

Of course, 2017 wasn’t a flawless year. I made plenty of mistakes. These stand out:

I ignored my intuition. Doing so cost my business partners $160,000. Oops. I was the lead partner on two different projects. In one case I decided to fire one of our most profitable clients (he was exceptionally unpleasant to work with). In another, I decided to fire one of the partners (he was lying to us). Unfortunately for my sanity, these two problems came to a head at the exact same time, and I fired both the client and the partner on the same day. Yeah… that was a long afternoon.

While I’m glad that I addressed these problems head on, they could have been prevented if I trusted my gut a bit more. In both cases I had a hunch that something wouldn’t work out with these people.

I gave very incomplete advice in the article on people pleasing. In this article I advocated putting your needs above other people’s 99% of the time. In doing so, I missed something embarrassingly obvious: focusing exclusively on your needs will put you on the fast path to isolation.

Since publishing the article I’ve realized a simple truth: forming deep relationships requires give and take between individuals. I’ve realized that there are plenty of good reasons to put other people’s needs ahead of your own, especially if they are people you love or want to get closer to.

Don’t get me wrong: I think it’s important that you prioritize your needs, especially your need for sustained self-care. However, with loved ones, I think it’s also important to consider their needs, and periodically put theirs first. Just make sure that they are willing to do the same for you. If you want a guideline, it’s this: default to focusing on your needs, but be open to prioritizing the needs of others, too, especially if there’s a good reason.

If you’re spending a lot of time with people who are unwilling to help you meet your needs and preferences, then I’d urge you to slowly phase that relationship out of your life (unless their children).

I missed the timeline for releasing my course on pro speaking. Again. This time by about 10 months. For the past three years I’ve been working behind the scenes on a course to help professional speakers build their businesses.

My plan was to release the course in March of 2017. However, as the release approached, I realized that with a bit more effort, I could make the course exponentially more effective. So instead of releasing it, I refined it (again) and ran one more round of testing. The testing takes about six months to do correctly, and I’m thrilled to report that the tests went really, really well. The course will be released next month (eeep!). If you’d like updates, please hop on my mailing list.

What went well

The year-end review wouldn’t be complete without a quick look at what went well in 2017. While there were a lot of stand out moments and accomplishments, these are the most significant to me:

This blog grew by about 3x (and I owe it all to you)! In 2017 I published 24 articles, including this one, which was my first truly viral piece (I still get hate mail about it). Along the way, readership nearly tripled in size and I owe it all to you. Thank you. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate the fact that you take the time to read this stuff. It means more than I can express.

Men tend to grow more isolated as they get older. I worked hard to buck that trend. It’s normal for men’s social lives to shrivel up as they get older. While it’s tempting to dismiss this as no big deal, it’s actually a huge deal. Our relationships are one of the few things that make life worth living. They also directly correlate with (and arguably cause) things like happiness, success, health, contentment, and meaning.

So this year, I paid careful attention to my social life. I hosted professional events, guys nights, and a bunch of dinner parties for awesome people. I also started hosting monthly conference calls with my close guy friends from college who all live in different states. And of course, at the tail end of 2016 I met L* and had a blast spending 2017 with her (here’s to the next year of growth, adventure and koalas!).

For those of you who also want to double down on your social life, I wrote an article about how I built mine, here. For those of you who are interested in overcoming men’s isolation, I wrote two articles about that (here and here).

I ran a men’s retreat in February with Nick Notas. It was one of my favorite live events of all time. It was also one of only three live events I worked on in 2017. It was great to work alongside Nick, who is both a close friend and someone I admire. But more than that, it was an honor to help these men improve their lives. Nick and I spoke with them earlier this month, and they’ve all experienced dramatic growth. While Nick and I are certainly not responsible for all of their growth – they did a lot of work on their own – it was a true privilege to contribute to it. Thanks guys.

Saying no. Finally, I got in the habit of saying no more often than ever before. I declined requests to hop on the phone, grab a coffee, give free advice, and arbitrarily “connect,” like it was my job. This freed up huge amounts of time and sanity. It’s not that I don’t want to connect with these people – I do – it’s just that there are only so many hours in the day.

Finally, thank you

I know I’ve said this before, but once again, thank you. When I started this blog a few years ago I wasn’t entirely sure it would be worth reading. I know that seems like I’m making it up, but I’m not. I literally wrote about that doubt in my very first post.

It’s been a true pleasure writing for you this year. And to those of you who left comments or reached out, it’s been great getting to know you. It makes this work even more exciting and meaningful. Thank you.

Here’s to making 2018 the best year of our lives so far!

Staring the human condition straight in the eye

“Every morning I awake torn between a desire to save the world and an inclination to savor it. This makes it hard to plan the day. But if we forget to savor the world, what possible reason do we have for saving it? In a way, the savoring must come first.”

-E.B. White

***

If I had to capture the span of the emotional and spiritual existence in one moment, I think it would be this: holding someone you love while she passes away in your arms. That moment captures it all: love, loss, light, darkness, connection, isolation, cruelty, beauty, and so much more.

It reminds me that our lives and our world are both overwhelmingly beautiful and cruel.

Embedded within that realization is a quiet secret: it’s possible to adjust the dials of life. Doing that begins with learning to stare the beauty and the cruelty straight in the eye.

Connecting to the beauty

Your existence alone is a near miracle. Without effort, your heart rhythmically pumps blood, neurons fire, and countless internal systems function in harmony.

You were born with god-like powers of creation and destruction. Moment by moment you can work to improve your life and others’. We can create, destroy, and change in a way that no other creature can.

While you’re alive, you’re granted access to countless forms of joy and pleasure. On the simple end, you can savor a piece of candy, play with a puppy, listen to music, or watch a film.

On the profound end you can be swept away by the raw beauty of nature, mesmerized by the cosmos, and observe countless people acting selflessly. If you allow yourself, you can feel the love of your friends and family coursing through your body.1

With a bit of stillness you can find deep levels of connection between yourself and all other life forms. With a bit of openness and reflection, the reality of deep interconnection of life always seems to topple the illusion of autonomy and isolation.   

Embracing the cruelty

Of course, to only notice the beauty is to miss half the story.

Life was inflicted upon you, and with it came the promise that you and everyone you love will eventually pass away. Not only that, but virtually all of us will deal with various forms of trauma throughout our lives.

As you move through the stages of life, you’ll be forced to wrestle with a quiet truth: there is an inherent shittiness to the human experience that sometimes becomes all encompassing. Your boss annoys you, your bike gets stolen, you miss your flight, and your best friend forgets your birthday.

Through it all, finding contentment is deceptively difficult; we seem to have a nearly limitless capacity for being dissatisfied with our situation.

And the world we are forced to inhabit is filled with needless suffering in the form of starvation, violence, war, neglect, and poverty.

As we move through our lives, we hope that the fates and our loved ones will treat us with gentleness, understanding, and compassion, but sometimes they don’t. In fact, half the time we don’t even offer gentleness, compassion, and understanding to ourselves.

Living in a world that is both too beautiful and too cruel

How does one live in a world defined by overwhelming beauty and cruelty?

The common answer seems to involve numbness and willful ignorance, but that comes with a cost. Dialing down your ability to feel pain hinders your ability to experience beauty and love.

Fortunately, with a bit of practice we can learn to let the beauty overwhelm the cruelty.

Begin by cutting back on whatever you use to distract or numb yourself. This does not mean perfect sobriety, giving up sugar forever, never playing a video game, or anything like that. Instead, it means being thoughtful about the stuff you use to take the edge off. Engage them with moderation and intention. Consider giving up your vices for a few weeks to ensure that you’re the one in control.

Next, allow yourself to be weak, open, and vulnerable. Most of us have spent our lives trying to be as strong as we possibly can. All of the abuse, trauma, disappointment, heartache, and fear? Let it in.2

Allowing yourself to be weak will be one of the most difficult things you’ve ever done, but it will also be one of the most powerful and authentic. Remember you can be a warrior when you need to be.

As you embrace your weakness, you’ll start to notice the wounds you’ve been ignoring. Now you can begin to heal them. How? Start with whatever you’re drawn to. Go to a plant medicine ceremony, talk to a therapist, move to a new city, travel the world, visit a shaman, do breath work, meditate, journal, look at yourself in the mirror and say, “I love you,” go paleo, go vegan, go to church, try a 12-step program, become a dice person, whatever. Keep trying new things until you find something that works, and when you do, go as deep as you possibly can.

Stay open to new ideas. Many people have found healing and relief in unexpected places.

As you begin to heal, your final task is to make life a bit better for other people too. Do simple things like picking up a bit of trash, bigger things like dedicating your life to fighting oppression, and anything in between. This will allow you to cut through the illusion of separation and feel the deep levels of connection that bind us all.

Move through the world with gentleness and compassion towards yourself and others. Give when you can and ask for help when you need it. If you can mostly enjoy life and leave the world a little bit better off than you found it, I think it’s safe to say that you lived well.

Post script: on working with death

While I put death under the “cruelty” section of this article, I’m not 100% sure that was the right decision. If you’re willing to accept the simple reality that all of us will die and that tomorrow isn’t promised, something almost miraculous happens.

The shittiness of life melts away a bit. In it’s place you’ll start to notice the gentle urgency of beauty, love, kindness and connection asserting itself.

Instead of neglecting opportunities to be kind and loving to yourself and others, you’ll embrace them. Instead of pulling yet another all nighter for yet another meaningless project, you’ll curl up in bed with your lover. Instead of allowing someone’s anger and anxiety to infect you, you’ll let it roll off your shoulders, opting to call a friend and shoot the bull. Instead of worrying about money, you’ll know that money will never make you as happy and content as the people you love do.

Wrapped within the unavoidable reality of death, you can find a surprising amount of beauty and connection.

 

How to make friends as an adult: a guide to finding and connecting with people you love

New Year’s Eve, 2015, Denver, CO, 11:50 pm: I feel lonely. Though New Year’s Eve is one of the biggest party nights of the year, I was only invited to one small event. I joined J* and A* for dinner, but they dropped me off at my apartment before midnight.

Instead of spending the last moments of 2015 with friends, I’m alone. I have nothing better to do, so, I decide to end 2015 and start 2016 in silent meditation.

When I open my eyes, I make a simple promise to myself: in 2016, I’ll build a great social life. My goal is to have plenty of options for New Years Eve 2016.

***

While you’re in school, making friends is easy. In the real world… not so much. Life often puts thousands of miles between ourselves and the people we love most. I am a perfect example of this – none of my family or close friends from college live in Denver, and only one of my friends from high school lives here. With only one exception, all of my old friends are a plane ride away.

On top of that, life gets cluttered with paying bills, running errands, commuting, building careers, and all the other necessary evils of adult life. It leaves little time for making and deepening new relationships. It becomes easier to heat up a frozen pizza and watch Bojack Horseman than to see if that person you’d like to hangout with wants to grab a beer.

As a result many people feel lonelier than they ever expected they’d be. They find themselves drinking, watching TV, and “staying busy” to distract from the glaring isolation. Heck, I’ve been there.

To further complicate the matter, most people don’t really know how to go about making friends, especially after college. You’d think that after all these years, we’d know how to do it, but many of us don’t. Men especially seem to prefer the pain of isolation to risking the raw vulnerability required for true friendship.

When I say “friend,” I don’t mean someone you call just to shoot the shit with (though that’s important too). What I mean is someone you respect and admire and someone who feels the same way about you. Someone you can open up to and trust. Someone who will help you wipe away the tears when the world rips you apart and celebrate with you when you’re on top of it all.

In this article, we’re going to discuss how to make friends at three different levels. First, we’ll discuss how to find people that you have the potential to click with. Second, you’ll learn how to create communities of people you love. Finally, we’ll talk about how to form deep relationships with a select few.

Along the way, I’ll share tips for overcoming social anxiety, being gentle with yourself, and letting the best parts of yourself shine through.

Part 1: finding and connecting with people you adore

The vast majority of the people on this planet are people you won’t want to be friends with. In fact, finding those you actually like is kind of like mining for gold.

The good news is that you can speed the process up. The trick is to create and attend social events where you’re likely to collide with great people. In most cases, if you enjoy the event, there’s a good chance that it will be filled with people you’ll get along with.

A few ideas to get you started:

  • If you work remotely or for yourself, join a coworking space. I’ve met a handful of good friends in coworking spaces.
  • Take a multi-week class that interests you (think cooking, dance, improv, acting, sword fighting, etc.).
  • Participate in group fitness classes like yoga, CrossFit, spinning, boxing, or a running club.
  • Join a rec sports league like Ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, soccer, flag football, bocce, etc.
  • Work for a company that hires great people. One of my close friends closed his small business because it was too isolating and joined a startup. He is so much happier.
  • Attend meetup groups that interest you.
  • Volunteer for a cause or political campaign that matters to you.
  • Go to religious or spiritual services that speak to you.
  • Join a book, knitting, or game club.
  • Start a slow but steady campaign to convince your friends to move to you. I know this idea sounds insane, but I’ve had surprising success… hi S*, hi M* – I’m so glad you’re in Denver!
  • Move into a group house – you can find houses looking for roommates on Craigslist as well as other sites and apps. If you take the time to find a house that’s a good fit for you, this can be a fast track to jump-starting or rebooting your social life.

The goal is to hang out with people  you are likely to get along with. Of course, just showing up isn’t enough on it’s own. You also have to interact, at least a bit. If you’re shy or introverted (like me), you don’t need to leap out of your comfort zone every time you leave the house.

Instead, start off by consistently showing up. In many cases some of the more outgoing members of the group will come up and start talking to you.

If that doesn’t happen or if you want to be proactive, initiate conversations. I tend to go with, “Hi – I’ve seen you around a few times but don’t think we’ve met – I’m Jason.” After that I’ll generally ask a question related to the context we’ve met in. For example, “How long have you been doing CrossFit?” if we meet at the gym, or “What line of work are you in?” if we meet at a coworking space.

If you’re like most people and have trouble remembering names or details, take quick notes on the people you meet. Scribble down their name, what they look like, and what you guys talked about. If you want to get fancy, write down the important things that are happening in their lives and ask about them next time your paths cross.

Part 2: create a community

With a bit of luck, getting involved in one or more of the activities above will allow you to join an existing community. If so, terrific! You can skip this step. If not, read on.

If you find yourself in the situation of knowing a lot of people but still feeling lonely, it’s almost certainly due to a lack of community.

Almost everyone is longing for community, so forming one tends to be easier than expected. By being proactive, you put yourself in the amazing position of being the linchpin for a group of people you enjoy, which will make your social life explode with activity.

Begin organizing and attending events and inviting the people you’ve met to come with you. A quick text, email, or facebook message a few days before the event, followed by a confirmation a few hours before will do the trick.

If you’re going to host an event on your own and are worried that no one will attend, here’s a trick I lean on all the time. Before you invite the whole group, confirm the event with one or two people who you really like and encourage them to invite people too. This way, in the unlikely event that everyone else declines your invitation, you’ll still have a few people to hang out with.  

Here are some of my favorite group activities:

  • Organize a lunch where you introduce all of your professional contacts to one another. Bonus points if you put a bit of thought into the guest list and invite people who are likely to get along or do business together.
  • Invite your friends to attend a sports game (if your city has a rugby team, go check them out – it’s surprisingly fun and inexpensive).
  • Host a dinner party at your apartment. If the idea of cooking for a group intimidates you, try ordering in, asking a friend to help, or making it a potluck.
  • Teach something you love. If there is something you love doing – let’s say salsa dancing for example – start teaching other people how to do it. You can do this in a professional capacity by offering lessons or informally by inviting your friends over and teaching them the basics before you all go out dancing.
  • If you drink, invite people to a wine, beer, or whiskey tasting. You can find a bar that offers this, or tell everyone to bring their favorite bottle to share with the group.
  • Invite friends to happy hour.
  • Organize a brunch.
  • Go to trivia night.
  • Go to karaoke night.
  • Host board game nights (lately I’ve been winning big at Settlers of Catan, but getting my ass handed to me at Coup and Ticket to Ride).
  • If your town has any quirky or seasonal events happening, organize a group to go check them out (think axe throwing, go karts, cultural festivals, cool exhibits, haunted houses, etc).

Of course, organizing events comes with risk: it’s basically guaranteed that some people will decline your invitation. When this happens, it’s hard not to feel at least a bit rejected. Many people let their fear of rejection prevent them from ever extending an invitation. Bad idea. It’s far better to deal with minor rejection than to be lonely and isolated. Besides, rejection is usually far less personal than it feels.1

Part 3: forming deep relationships

The real goal isn’t just to have people to hang out with; it’s also to find a few people you can form deep relationships with.

For many, true intimacy is both intimidating and elusive.  Fortunately, it’s a learnable skill. There are two components here. First, you must allow yourself to be open and vulnerable. Second, you have to create space for people to be open and vulnerable around you.

Component 1: opening yourself up

Most people struggle to open up and be vulnerable around other people. In fact, many people struggle to admit their weaknesses and vulnerabilities even to themselves. And yet, opening up is the only true path towards deep, fulfilling relationships.

Begin by sharing how you’re actually doing in the moment and letting your guard down. Feeling depressed? Secretly afraid that your hard work will amount to nothing? Lonely? Excited because you got a raise? Feeling really powerful and synced up? Let the other person know. Over time, share more and more of yourself. Yes, doing this will usually feel risky. That’s the point.

As you develop intimacy, the goal isn’t to recite facts about yourself while secretly remaining guarded. The goal is to allow all of yourself to be seen, even though it’s pretty much guaranteed that parts of the real you feel messy, complicated, afraid, and unattractive.

Of course, deep relationships can’t just be about you, they also have to be about the other person, too…

Component 2: creating space for the other person to open up

The other part of intimacy is genuinely caring about the other person and making sure they know it. For most, this is often easier said than done.

Fortunately, there are a few tricks to this:

  • Stop playing it safe and ask questions that you actually care about. All that complicated and taboo stuff in life like death, sex, politics, drugs, religion, and philosophy? They make amazing conversation topics. Lately I’ve been asking people, “What do you think happens when we die?” and “What’s going on in your spiritual / religious life right now?” When you do this, be generous with your attention and spend more time listening than talking. You should always be willing to answer any question that you ask.
  • When someone tells you something that seems important follow-up about it later on. Is your new friend perpetually bothered by her lazy coworker? Ask her how the situation is going next time you see her. Solving her problem, offering insight, or being clever isn’t the point – the point is to let them know you care.
  • Remember that true friendship is a gradual process. Intimacy is (usually) created over the course of many encounters with the other person, each leading to a deeper and deeper relationship. You really don’t need to share your greatest insecurities and fears on day one. Instead, pave the way so that on day 1000, you’re filled with appreciation for that person’s role in your life.
  • Don’t judge. We are all filled with contradictions, laziness, flaws, traumas, quirks, and other unappealing attributes. If someone opens up to you enough to let you see them, don’t judge her. Doing so will prevent her from opening up in the future. Instead, respond with curiosity, comfort, or compassion and by opening up yourself.

As you start to form deeper and deeper relationships, it’s important to remember one final thing: not everyone is capable of, or willing to, form real relationships. When you meet someone like this, you have a few options. You can maintain a surface level relationship. You can gently let the person go. Or you can love the shit out of them exactly as they are, which – with a bit of luck – may be the exact thing they need to melt the walls around their heart.

Postscript 1: If you’re really struggling…

If you’re really struggling with intimacy or loneliness or just can’t seem to get your social life off the ground, get help. If it’s a matter of needing a few new skills, a bit of encouragement, and some accountability, hire a coach. If you sense that the issue is deeper find a good therapist.

Postscript 2: how I met my girlfriend (or, one year later…)

New Years Eve, 2016, Denver, CO, 11:50 pm: I can’t believe it. Just a few minutes ago there were 30 people in my studio apartment. Now we’re all at dance club about to ring in the new year. This is amazing.

Last year, it was my goal to be able to have better plans for New Years Eve 2016, than I did for New Years Eve 2015. I’ve succeeded beyond my wildest expectations. Instead of just attending someone else’s party, I threw my own. Not only that, but this really amazing woman, L*, came to the party too. Her energy bowled me over. I hope I can get to know her better in 2017…

Why following your passions is bad career advice

I used to be one of those annoying guys who urged people to find their passion and encouraged them to turn it into it their job. As far as I could tell, it seemed like an obvious formula for creating a great, profitable life.

Unfortunately, I was wrong. I was falling victim to cliché and generally bad career advice. More than that, I was missing a big blind spot in my own life: I already turned two of my passions into jobs and grew to hate them.

As a child, I studied magic because I loved it. My love of magic led to my performing at birthday parties, then events around town, and eventually for Fortune 500s and pro sports teams. Along the way, I completely fell out of love with magic. In fact, I ended up hating it. What started as a passion turned into an obligation.

The same thing happened with speaking. I started working as a pro speaker because I loved it. As I became increasingly successful, I started to lose interest in getting on stage.

We are often counseled to “do what we love,” or to “follow our passions and figure out how to make a living from them later.” This way, we’ll “never have to work a day in our lives.”

As it turns out, monetizing your passion is a pretty bad move. Not only is it overly quixotic, it also runs the risk of ruining the exact things that bring you joy. In this article, we’re going to consider why blurring the line between passions and professions tends to make people unhappy.

First things first: you have permission to not follow your passions

I know that a lot of people feel like they’re doing it wrong unless they are Tom- Cruise-jumping-on-Oprah-Winfrey’s-couch-happy about their jobs.

If that’s you, I want to be clear about something: it is 100% fine to take a job that you like but don’t love and then use your free time to pursue your passions and hobbies.

In fact, for most people, doing anything besides that is a pretty bad idea (more on that in a second). So if you’re just looking for permission to have a normal job, you’ve got it! It’s okay if you’re not leaping out of bed every morning excited to get to work. Just make sure that your work is engaging enough and leaves you with time for yourself.

An even more productive approach is to consider a simple question: do you hate your job? If the answer is no, you’re on the right track. If the answer is yes, then you need to start looking for a new one.

Passion is more complicated than it seems

To further complicate the matter, passion is more complicated and elusive than it seems.

The act of finding your passion is fairly counter-intuitive. As Cal Newport points out in “So Good They Can’t Ignore You,” passion tends to come from the investment of time and hard work on projects you find interesting. As your skill improves and you begin to understand the nuance and beauty of your craft, then you’re likely to feel passionate about it. In other words, passion doesn’t inspire action like we often assume; action inspires passion.

The complexity doesn’t end there. Once you’ve found something you love, you have to accept that your passions will change – often dramatically – as you age. The wild partying that defined the best moments of your 20’s is unlikely to interest you in your 60s.

Want to kill your passions? Monetize them.

Not only is building your life around your passions tricky, but also monetizing your passions is likely to kill them. Here’s why…

1) Many passions can’t really be monetized. I love playing Settlers of Catan, reading, and a good day sailing. I could get a job at a board game shop, work as a reader for as a publishing agent, or teach sailing at a summer camp. The problem is that those are in the neighborhood of my passions without actually being the thing I love.

If you squint, you can almost convince yourself that you’re doing what you love, but you aren’t. Instead, you’re settling for a lower paying and less engaging job that you will eventually begin to resent.

2) You will fall victim to overexposure. Imagine if you had to eat pizza – or whatever your favorite food is – every day. Pizza would lose its desirability quickly. This happens with pretty much everything.

We need a bit of distance to truly appreciate the things in our lives. Unfortunately, most of us can’t separate ourselves from our jobs. We depend on them to pay the bills. This means that if you monetize your passion, the intensity of feeling that once delighted you will inevitably fade away.

3) Turning what you love into your job makes you beholden to it. Unless you’re independently wealthy, you’re beholden to having some sort of a job for most of your life.

At first glance, getting paid for what you’re passionate about is wildly appealing. When you dig a little deeper, you start to realize that being forced to engage with something makes it much harder to love. For example, most of us hated “The Great Gatsby” when we had to read it in High School, but actually liked it when we reread it later in life.

The beautiful thing about your passions is that you choose to do them. If I’m not interested in blogging next week – even though I normally love it – no biggie. I can take the week off and work on my next article whenever inspiration strikes. In contrast, we do not have the luxury of choosing to skip work just because we don’t feel like going.  

Furthermore, your job inevitably gets infused with stress, deadlines, anxiety, and annoyance. For many, getting paid to do what you love is a great way to lose interest in the exact thing that used to light you up.

4) The successful people who urge you to “follow your heart” tend to be short sighted. It’s popular for celebrities, entrepreneurs, athletes, executives and the like to report that they succeeded because they followed their hearts. This narrative is so common that it seems almost insane to argue against it.

The reality is simple: following your heart is not a sure-fire path to success. In fact, it’s risky and short sighted. It ignores the jarring importance of luck, circumstance and privilege in extreme success. There are countless people who have followed their hearts and had it dramatically stunt their careers. Of course, we never hear from them because they aren’t famous and it’s considered impolite to ask someone why they didn’t succeed.

So yes, it’s extremely compelling when successful people tell us to follow our hearts. And to be honest, I think we should – just not necessarily with our careers.

PS: Falling in love with your job isn’t the secret to a good life anyways

The reason that most people want to wed their passion to their profession is because it seems like an easy path to happiness and the good life. I get that.

Unfortunately, it’s not that simple. The real trick is to find a job that enables space and energy for you to do the things that produce happiness within your life.

Happiness – as far as I can tell – comes from a fluid combination of knowing and loving yourself, having enough, proactive generosity, decent mental health, self-worth, rest, activity, service to others, and meaningful relationships. Oh, and Settlers of Catan. Lots and lots of Settlers.

 

Being cool with being normal

I have to confess that for most of my life, I thought I was destined for fame and world-class success. I didn’t think I’d be in the top 1% of my field – I truly thought I would be the undisputed best.

As a child magician, I believed I’d be the next Lance Burton or David Copperfield. When I worked in international development, I felt that I was uniquely qualified to save the world and that the UN Secretary General would be interested in my perspective. As a speaker, it seemed like just a matter of time before Oprah invited me onto her show.

I’m sure that reading this makes me seem like I was an egomaniac with delusions of grandeur, but we’ve all been there. Countless industries and individuals urge you to “be your best self” so that you can “achieve greatness” and “leave your legacy.”

Few of us were ever told that it’s likely we’ll be pretty good (but not world class) at one or two things, and mediocre at everything else.

Few of us were ever told that it’s ok if we’re not rich, famous, influential, or successful.

Few of us were ever told that identifying and respecting our limits brings far more happiness, than leaving our comfort zone and trying to be bigger than we are.

As a result, many people are walking around feeling flawed and inadequate simply because they are normal human beings. That’s fucked up.

In this article, we’re going to tackle a sticky subject: being cool with being normal. We’ll also cover the genesis and consequences of believing that you’re bigger and more capable than you actually are. Finally, we’ll discuss what happens when you decide to start accepting your limits instead of fighting against them.

We are bought and sold with delusions of grandeur

Culturally, we seem to value success and achievement more than joy and contentment.

We are constantly bombarded with messages from marketers, politicians, the media, and personal development weirdos telling us that the secret to success is to:

  • Accept responsibility for your reality1
  • #Hustle
  • Dream big
  • Become internally validated
  • Work hard
  • Work smart
  • Leave your comfort zone
  • Adopt a growth mindset
  • Refuse failure
  • Understand that good is the enemy of great
  • And a lot of other bullshit

We are told that if we do these things, then we can be everything to everyone. Emails will be responded to quickly, clients will adore you, you’ll make love to your partner twice a day, hummingbirds and butterflies will alight on your shoulder, investors will beg to back your next project, and if you meditate a bit, you’ll achieve enlightenment!

And at first glance all of this makes sense. In fact, it’s kind of inspiring. It leads us to believe that we are capable of achieving great things. It plays nicely into our egos. I mean, who wouldn’t want to believe that with a few simple changes we could be the next big thing?

But there’s a fairly obvious truth that everyone seems to be ignoring here: most of us aren’t destined for greatness – myself included. In fact, most of us aren’t even capable of greatness. We’ve been tricked into believing that we are. This is unfortunate because believing that you’re capable of something outside of your ability range isn’t a sign of confidence or self-worth, it’s a profound example of self-loathing.2

For decades, we’ve been sold faulty ideas about ourselves and our abilities. The delusion has led many of us to wrongfully feel unworthy of respect and love, simply because we’re not super-human.

To further complicate the matter there are two subtle truths at play. First, many of the people who do accumulate extreme success have rare gifts and absurd amount of luck that enables their success. Second, success alone isn’t all that valuable. If you don’t feel worthy of love or respect before you make it big, you certainly won’t after.

The magic of accepting your limits

Fortunately, there is a different and much more realistic path: figure out what your limits are, and operate within them.

Instead of forcing yourself out of your comfort zone all the time, relax and enjoy feeling stable and secure. If you choose to set wildly ambitious goals don’t beat yourself up if you fail to achieve them.3 Instead of blurring the lines about your truth, be honest about where you’re at in life, even if it isn’t pretty. And yes, there will always be people who achieve more than you do. That’s ok. Your life isn’t about them. It’s about you.

Operating within your limits is an act of self-love and self-acceptance. It also allows you to authentically create a life that you’ll adore living. It enables you to focus on the joy and contentment that’s already in your life, rather than striving for delusional exceptionalism.

The trick is to pay attention to what you have, instead of what you don’t have. Long term, this focus helps you wean off all things that conspire to make you feel inferior. In the moment, it helps to turn off your phone, computer, and anything else that pollutes your attention and bask in your own awesomeness for a bit.

When you do this, you start to notice amazing things that were obscured only moments before. You notice that you already have enough. You realize you’re loved and cared for by the people in your life. You’re conscious that you’ve already made a positive impact on your communities. You’re aware that many of the things you were striving for, you’ve had the whole time4. You notice that you are enough. Life shifts from feeling quietly oppressive to playfully enchanted.

13 things that are 100% ok when you release yourself from delusions of grandeur

I’ll leave you with a list of 13 things that are 100% ok, even in a world that pressures you into being bigger than you are:

  • Turning down a promotion, client, or raise in exchange for better work-life balance
  • Having a job that you’re apathetic about (if you hate your job though, it’s time to start looking)
  • Being a stay at home mother or father
  • Going back to work after becoming a parent
  • Thinking that extreme ambition is silly
  • Failing to be a man or woman of your word 100% of the time (spoiler alert: no one keeps their word 100% of the time)
  • Flaking every now and then-especially if you don’t care all that much for the person or event
  • Keeping a less than perfect diet (where would we be without pizza???)
  • Having an occasional shitty day for no good reason
  • Deciding not to start a business, blog, podcast, side hustle, or public facing social media account
  • Watching Netflix instead of meditating
  • Believing that Tim Ferriss, David Deida, and Gary V are out of touch and don’t actually make much sense
  • Being emotional and irrational (that is, human) from time to time

 

Why does success feel so empty?

Last week: Z*, who founded a 30 person company, is staying with me for the night.

When I show him my apartment, I awkwardly say, “I know people in our circle are supposed to have huge, flashy apartments, but I just have this small little studio.”

He says, “What are you talking about, man? Have you seen my place? It’s almost exactly this size.”

For the millionth time, I’ve fallen for a huge trap: instead of being content with my life, I feel inferior because I’m not world-stoppingly-successful.

***

So many of the people I know are preoccupied with success. They want more money, status, and influence. They’re chasing a better body, a better relationship, and a wilder social life. They need to change the world, start a business, and leave a legacy. In fact, they get so distracted by their ambition that they fail to notice how great life is in the moment. This happens to me too. I spend more time thinking about how to improve my life, than feeling content.

The results of all this striving are unfortunate…

Amazing people feel inferior when they should feel like rock stars

A* runs a blog that her readers love. In fact, they send her poems and videos expressing their gratitude. But when you ask her if she’s happy with her work, she sighs and says, “No. I feel like I should be rich, but I’m not. If I were truly successful, I’d be making more money.”

S*, a brilliant economic analyst, has made millions trading currencies. He’s emerged as one of the most influential people in his space. When I tell him, “Wow, what you’ve done is truly amazing,” he dismisses the comment. Instead, he tells me that he’s lonely and wishes he had a better social life.

M* is one of the most charismatic people you’ll ever meet. He can make a stranger feel like his best friend in just a few minutes. Yet, if you ask him what it’s like to be so wildly likable, he tells you that he wishes he spent less time partying and more time focused on his career.

J* is going back to school to become a nurse. Soon, he will heal people for a living. He loves his job, but in vulnerable moments, he admits that he’s self-conscious about not being a doctor.

T*, a former entrepreneur, just took her dream job as a marketing executive. Her work is a 15-minute walk from her house, the company has an amazing culture, and it gives her the predictable income that makes raising her family easier. Yet, the decision to close her business and get a “real job” made her feel like a failure.

Why are so many objectively amazing people feeling inferior?

The cognitive illusions that sabotage self-worth

There are three cognitive illusions that make feeling successful, worthy, and valuable more difficult than it should be.

The negativity bias – though I’ve written about this before, it’s worth reiterating. Our minds are wired to give more attention to negative stimuli than positive stimuli. This is called the negativity bias. The negativity bias is the reason we are more affected by criticism than compliments.

A billion years ago, it was an evolutionary advantage that enabled us to quickly identify the threats in our environment. Today, it just tricks us into feeling like an asshole when we shouldn’t. It creates an inner world that is disproportionately negative and blind to the stunning success and beauty that defines you.

One of the best ways to overcome the negativity bias (and experience a more pure form of reality) is to actively notice what’s going well in your life and in our world.

The black hole problem (and its cousin, the auto-crave problem) – virtually any metric of “success” renders you victim to the black hole problem: if you’re trying to obtain something tangible, you can always obtain more of it. Because of that, you’re unlikely to ever be satisfied.

When I was speaking, I often fell into the black hole. I used to happily take Greyhounds to my gigs. Eventually I started telling myself, “If a client ever pays for me to fly, then I’ll really feel successful.”

One day my clients started paying for flights. As soon as I got used to that, I told myself, “If a client ever pays to fly me first class, then I’ll feel successful.” Had I stayed on that hamster wheel, I would have wanted to fly in private jets, then on my own plane, and then my own highest quality private jet, and so on and so forth.

To further complicate the matter, our minds seem to be set to auto-crave. That means that as soon as we are content with something, we start craving something else, completely forgetting about the contentment that defined us moments before.

This happens all the time with food. After a big dinner, you’re sure that you’re full. That is, until someone brings out dessert. Suddenly, you realize that you have exactly enough room left for a brownie sundae!

The comparison trap – Since we were kids, we’ve all been told that comparing ourselves to others is a losing game. Still, we’re all human, and there are two subtle elements of comparison that make us feel particularly inferior.

1) Beginners tend to compare themselves to advanced practitioners.

It’s tempting for me to compare myself to the writers I admire. I’ve been working on the craft for a year or two, when they’ve been working for decades. To compare myself to them is insane, but I still do it all the time.

In the beginning stages of a business, we ask ourselves, “What would Zuckerberg do here?” When we’re trying to exercise more, we use images of fitness models to motivate us.  

By doing this, you’re effectively comparing a beginner’s rough draft to an expert’s finished product.

2) We assume that the people we admire have perfect lives and since our lives are imperfect, we assume we aren’t yet successful.

Spoiler alert: no one has a perfect life.

No amount of success allows you to escape being human. Even the best of the best struggle with doubt, insecurity, dirty dishes, and the occasional case of explosive diarrhea. They fight with their spouses over stupid shit, half-ass the projects they dislike, and watch too much Netflix. When you effectively take them off the pedestal, you realize that you’re much further along the path than you thought.

When we compare ourselves to people we perceive as perfect, we feel much more flawed for being human.  

How to feel the success you’ve already earned

First, learn to fall in love with process. No matter what you’re working on, the process is likely to demand more of your attention, energy, and time than the results will.

It’s important to create a day-to-day that you really enjoy. Take good care of your health, spend time with a community you love, and do meaningful work. Doing so will create more stability and happiness than success ever could.

Second, adjust your understanding of success. Many people – and I was one of them – think that “success” will eliminate all of their problems. I told myself that if I could just accumulate enough money and status, everything would be perfect: L* and I would never miscommunicate, I’d enjoy eating salads, and I’d become the strongest guy at my gym.

Bull shit, bull shit, bull shit.

At best, success can give you options. L* and I could set aside long periods of time to iron out sticky issues, I could hire a chef to make salads for me, and I could workout with a trainer at the gym.

But success doesn’t solve any of the existential problems that come along with being a human. Success won’t make you feel happy, worthy, or content; those are entirely different skill sets.

PS: Would success even change all that much? Possibly not.

A few weeks ago on a late Saturday afternoon: L* and I are having a tea on her patio. We’re talking about a project that I’ve been working on for the past few years. If it succeeds, it will make a dramatic difference in my finances.

L* goes inside to take a phone call, and I start daydreaming about what life will be like if the project succeeds and makes me rich and famous. My external life would become flashier. I’d pick up the tab more often, donate more to charity, get a fancy new apartment, and possibly buy a Jeep Wrangler.

But my inner life? I was shocked to realize that it probably wouldn’t change at all.

I suddenly understood that if I’m not content with what I have, getting more of it will only exacerbate my problems. If I can’t find happiness in this moment, more money won’t change that. If I don’t feel connected to or loved by the people I surround myself with, no amount of external validation will change my feelings.

It was a jarring thing to realize.